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Top 5 Popular NoMTBF Posts

Summer Break

Taking a week off away from the article writing so in the vain of summer reruns, providing a list to the top five posts from the NoMTBF site.

In no particular order:

  • Replacing MTBF with Bx- I am absolutely astonished that the reliability profession and its noted experts are unable to develop a better metric to characterize reliability performance and specify reliability requirements. I respectfully submit that there is a simple and eloquent solution that has successfully been used in the ball bearing and machine industry for decades (that actually predates MTBF/MTTF), that should be considered as a replacement to MTBF/MTTF.
  • MTBF: What is it Good For?- MTBF: What is it Good For? Guest post by Andrew Rowland, CRE, ReliaQual Associates, LLC I.  INTRODUCTION The mean time between failure (MTBF) is arguably the most prolific metric in the field of reliability engineering. The MTBF is used as a metric throughout a product’s life-cycle; from requirements, to validation, to operational assessment. Unfortunately, MTBF alone doesn’t … Continue reading MTBF: What is it Good For?
  • Where does 0.7eV come from- This post is a conversation first held on the LinkedIn group No MTBF. I’m capturing a portion of the contributions here to continue the discussion or to widen the audience. Reminds me of always assuming 95% confidence is the right value when designing a test, or assuming constant failure rate. So, let the conversation continue, starting … Continue reading Where does 0.7eV come from
  • The Worst Reliability Requirement- Most of us have seen reliability specified using a requirement like the following: The Zeus 5000 SUV shall have an MTBF of 144,269.5 miles with a 90% confidence. Some readers may not have seen reliability requirements specified in any other way.  What they have always seen has read something like:  The widget shall have an … Continue reading The Worst Reliability Requirement
  • Why The Drain in the Bathtub Curve Matters- Most reliability engineers are familiar with the life cycle bathtub curve, the shape of the hazard rate or risks of failure of a electronic product over time. A typical electronic’s life cycle bathtub curve is shown in figure 1.

 

Enjoy these again or for the first time.

“When you’re trying to create a career as a writer, a little delusional thinking goes a long way.” – Michael Lewis

Or when trying to eradicate MTBF – although I don’t think so.

Value

Adding value to build your career

As a reliability engineer we work across the organization to bring a reliable product to market. The value of meeting the customers reliability expectations results in customer satisfactions, increased sales and in some cases premium pricing. We want a reliable product. Being a pivotal element in the process means you have provided value to the organization and to their customers. Continue reading Value

5 Reliability Training Options

Just answered a question on where to find reliability engineering training on basics and statistics. There are plenty of options and below I’m listing just where to find the many, many options available to you. Continue reading 5 Reliability Training Options

Why The Drain in the Bathtub Curve Matters

Most reliability engineers are familiar with the life cycle bathtub curve, the shape of the hazard rate or risks of failure of a electronic product over time. A typical electronic’s life cycle bathtub curve is shown in figure 1. Continue reading Why The Drain in the Bathtub Curve Matters

The Linkedin NoMTBF group is growing and while not very active does have an occasional interesting discussion. Join the discussion and maybe relate how you have raised awareness around the proper use of MTBF.

http://www.linkedin.com/groups/No-MTBF-1857182/about